Tag Archives: game development

Quake and Doom’s Mechanics

So sock, level designer extraordinaire, had a tweet which triggered some interesting discussion:

I didn’t directly participate, as on this subject I find Twitter’s character limit to be too restrictive. Jehar and negke jumped in with thoughts, but I figured I would share mine here. At a glance Doom and Quake seem to be similar games. First person shooters made by largely the same team, and with the same key people of Romero, Carmack, and Petersen at the helm. But they have many fundamental differences, such that I find it hard to articulate it succinctly. As negke has dubbed me a master of verbosity, I shall do my best to live up to that. Continue reading

Quake Map Jam 3 Post-Mortem

Note: This post was written before the pack was released, so I’m far more embarrassed as to the map’s quality now than I was when this was written.

I’ve been rather quiet for a number of reasons, but a big one was my participation in the Quake community map jam. This is the third like it, and it used a Zerstorer theme. Being so inexperienced in the ways of mapping, and a huge fan of the mod Zerstorer, this appealed to me as there is room for brutalist architecture in a Zerstorer theme.

quakespasm 2014-10-30 20-10-53-37

By brutalist architecture, I mean low skill. So I pounced on it. I am rather proud of the fact that despite its numerous problems, the small scale, the features cut, and having ~1/4th the detail level I would like, that I still completed it. It is a titled level which you can play from start to finish, with themes, traps, secrets, and little bits to it. So this is kind of a post-mortem, but since I mostly did things wrong, it functions more as a list of things I need to do next time. I probably won’t do another map jam because though the deadline kept me motivated, it also put some stress on my family life. Sure a Quake map was part of my “bucket list” (or backpack list for Quake), so we pushed through knowing the deadline, but in the future any mapping will be likely on my own timeline. I.e., over months, rather than weeks.

So all that being said, Continue reading

Hail to the King, Long Live the Duke

Duke Nukem Forever (DNF) was a long awaited game by many including myself. It was also a major disappointment to everyone who played it, with the highest praise I ever saw being a comment about the executable itself being stable. It has been slagged, slandered, and slapped in numerous languages, and much of it is deserved, however I would like to illustrate that not only are these complaints not wholly correct, but that their rear-view prognostications, “If only they had” scenarios, were also doomed. Their own suggestions in many cases would have resulted in an equally bad game.

Duke Nukem is raucous, crass, ludicrous, sexist (but not misogynistic), over the top, simplistic, juvenile, and unreserved. He is not deep or complex, and if he were we wouldn’t enjoy him nearly as much. Duke’s depth comes from our steering of him, we act out within his skin (and muscles). In Duke Nukem 3D (Duke3D) he is a cartoony figure in a comparatively realistic world, he has fame for his world-saving antics, but he is the exception and his behavior is tolerated in the immediately appreciable wake of his results: the world persisting. More specifically, he doesn’t talk all of the time, and though possibly an artifact of the technology of 1995 and 1996, it meant you didn’t get tired of him. Continue reading